BHS 2015 HSC ADVANCED ENGLISH

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To all of my beloved HSC Advanced English students,
You’ve worked hard… you’ve got this!!
I have confidence that you know what you need to know… and you do have the writing skills to show your knowledge and understanding.
So, relax – take your time – UNPACK the questions (and the rubric)!! – and write legibly 🙂

It’s been a privilege and a pleasure to work with all of you over the past 18 months.
I’ll be channeling lots of good, positive and calm energy into the hall tomorrow and Tuesday.

May the force be with you!

All the best of luck,
Miss Krieger xx

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MODULE B – CRITICAL STUDY OF TEXT

CHEAT SHEET for the Hamlet assessment task:

The task is divided into two different parts.

Part 1. You will need to analyse (and compare) the ideas and techniques between two different interpretations of the play – via film (Branagh and Olivier) – on Thursday

Part 2. – You will answer a Long Response question in relation to the two  different interpretations of the one scene… and how this once scene informs the broader context of the play (in relation to the ideas and characterization in the play Hamlet)  – on Friday

Tips and hints!

 

  • The long-response is not necessarily a “half essay”. You *will* write one or two paragraphs – but your focus is to answer the actual question you’re given – in an explicit way. You “may” choose to integrate a quote from a noted critic / theorist – but – remember that Branagh and Olivier are themselves ‘critics’ of the play… as they have both analysed the play and figured out what their individual interpretation of the play (the characters – the plot – the idea – the setting – the language) actually is!
  • Each director/actor (Branagh and Olivier) portrays their own individual understanding of the character and values and agenda of the character of Hamlet.
    • The different interpretations were filmed 50 years apart.
    • How has the context of each director (50 years apart) influenced their interpretations and film choices?
    • How has your context influenced your interpretation of the play? How has your context influenced your reaction to each film-version of Act III Sc I? Has your context influenced your “preferred” interpretation of the two different film interpretations of the play?
    • You have to decide whether or not Branagh and Oliver develop textual integrity in their interpretations within the broader scope of the play?

The key thing is that you actually sustain a clear thesis which answers the long-response questionexplicitly – with integrated evidence and analysis.

The following discussion notes may help you focus your thoughts….

Discussion Notes on Act III – Sc I – “get thee to a nunnery”

Prior to the “get thee to a nunnery” scene (Act III, Sc I), Shakespeare’s characterization* of Hamlet positions the audience to perceive him as being somewhat selfish (self-reflective?) and driven by his own personal agenda. Hamlet appears to only focus on his own feelings, beliefs and self-protection. He is characterized as being insensitive to the dominant Elizabethan social values concerning romantic relationships and the religious beliefs surrounding death and mourning. A humanist reading of Hamlet’s characterization* up until Act 3 suggests that Hamlet is more concerned with his own individual needs, reflections, emotions and personal values than the “good” of society [including his mother and his friends] and the “state of Demark”. Plot developments in Act I and Act II which characterize this ‘selfish’ Hamlet include: his singular rejection of the marriage of Claudius and Gertrude [integrate quote and analysis]; his violent threats to Horatio and Bernado when Hamlet insists on following the Ghost {integrate quote and analysis]; the ensuing violence towards Horatio and Bernardo when Hamlet forces them to vow to reveal nothing about the Ghost to anyone [integrate  quote and analysis]; Laertes’ warning to Ophelia about Hamlet’s dishonorable intentions and the futility of her romantic attachment to the Prince of Denmark [integrate quote and analysis]; Polonius reiterates Laertes’ initial warnings and instructs Ophelia to return Hamlet’s gifts and forbids Ophelia to continue the ‘insincere’ romance with Hamlet [integrate quote and analysis]; and, finally, we see Hamlet playing mind games with his school friends Rosencrantz and Guildenstern – and “performing” for his own interests and, seemingly, his own protection. Hamlets selfish and privately-guarded motivations appear to contrast with the shared concerns of the “state” and the other characters. The rest of the characters (save for Horatio) plot and scheme amongst each other, supposedly for the ultimate benefit of Hamlet’s peace of mind and – by definition – for the peaceful regeneration of the ‘State of Denmark”. Whilst the characters around Hamlet assume that his “mad” behavior is a direct reflection of his love for Ophelia… the dramatic irony of Hamlet’s soliloquys creates a sense of uncertainty in the audience. The audience is conflicted between their perceptions of Hamlet’s private musings and the public assumptions of the other characters? The explosive scene between Ophelia and Hamlet (Act III. Sc I) raises more questions than it answers. Is Hamlet abusive towards Ophelia because he truly is in love with her and he is trying to protect her by distancing himself from her? Is he “performing” purely in the knowledge that he is being spied upon and, subsequently, aims to confuse his spies? Is his ‘performance’ actually a true manifestation of his paranoia and inner-conflict which he uses to deflect his reluctance to follow the Ghost’s commands and is he even aware of the real reasons behind his own delay in avenging his father’s death?

In this scene, we watch Hamlet use Ophelia and his madness for ambiguous reasons. ” Throughout the many versions of Hamlet, many productions suggest that Hamlet is aware that Claudius and Polonius using Ophelia and that they’re all conspiring to spy on him. In the scene, Hamlet exercises his abilities to play act. Ironically, Ophelia too is acting a part – against her true feelings and better judgement.  Hamlet begins this scene with adoration and heartfelt happiness to see Ophelia. But, being in a crucial position not to trust anyone, and suspecting the contrived nature of the meeting with Ophelia, Hamlet’s behavior becomes nonsensical and erratic as he quizzes Ophelia. He closely observes her reactions and her “honesty”. Hamlet employed this tactic with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern (Act II, scene ii). In the clarity of the high modality of the mono-syllabic questions “are you honest?” (Act III, sc. 1, line 113) and “are you fair?,”(line 115) he watches Ophelia as she stumble over her answers. In a split second, Hamlet suspects that she too is ‘performing’. Hamlet deflects his suspicions by becoming increasingly erratic and abusive. Through his “lunacy,” he rants and raves to her, convincing Ophelia that his madness comes from her inconstant nature. He leads her through one more trap when asking about her father (line 141). Ophelia fails this last test miserably, and he knows that she lies to him willingly and her father locates himself within spying distance. Hamlet then falls farther into his playacting of lunacy and puts on a terrific display, leading Ophelia, Claudius, and Polonius to think that his madness sprouted from Ophelia. It would seem that Hamlet successfully deflects suspicion away from the task afforded him by the Ghost – to kill Claudius!

Shakespeare reassures the reader that Hamlet did love Ophelia, in “I did love you once.” (line 125) – but this admission conflicts with the abuse he forces her to endure. The audience is left uncertain and suspicious of Hamlet’s true character and his true feelings for Ophelia.  Is he being completely self-obsessed and, as Laertes and Polonius believe, the equivalent of modern day “player”? Do you feel sympathy for Ophelia? Or – is Ophelia nothing more than a naive and “obedient” Elizabethan lady who has played a dangerous game with the Prince? Does the audience crave for Hamlet’s love for Ophelia to be true and genuine? Why?  In the subsequent Acts of the play, it is confirmed that, indeed, Hamlet did love Ophelia. in Act V, sc.i, Hamlet proclaims his love for her (and his grief) at the funeral.

It is important to consider that Ophelia is an “obedient” daughter and a virtuous lady in society [integrate quotes and analysis]. Her character clearly contrasts with the humanist values which are revealed in Hamlet’s character. The contrast between “rigid social order” of Ophelia and the “renaissance humanist values” of Hamlet would challenge the changing social attitudes and religious attitudes of an Elizabethan audience. Can you now, as a member of a modern audience, still appreciate the personal conflict involved in complying to traditional social expectations on the one hand – and – on the other hand –  fulfilling your true personal and more selfish emotions and beliefs?

Finally, after being visited by the ghost of his dead father, Hamlet’s top priority is to ascertain the truth of the Ghost’s allegations and then to avenge his father’s murder. Within an Elizabethan context, the audience is, like Hamlet, aware that revenge murder is a mortal sin. Similarly, it remains an act of treason to plot against a King. Whilst it appears that Hamlet is strategically performing and “becoming mad” to deflect suspicion and, potentially, his own murder – Shakespeare sustains that niggling element of ambiguity which raises the question… is it possible that Hamlet is actually edging on madness from his paranoia and his inner-conflict between his religious indoctrination and his humanist values?

* Characterisation =

1.     What the character says

2.     What the character does and how the character reacts/responds

3.     What other characters say about (and ‘to’) the character

 

 

dj_b2school_pencilhomework_c  Basic RGBCLICK ON THE NEXT LINK FOR A NEW! NEW! NEW! — AND AMMENDED VERSION OF a PARTIALLY-ANNOTATED MATRIX for the  practice assess task– which will be completed in-class on Thursday and Friday – Week 5, Term 3, 2015.

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dj_b2school_pencilhomework_cClick here to view a short lecture on Olivier’s version of Act 3 Sc 4 –  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HExqQTsU9zQ

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Basic RGBWhy isn’t Hamlet crowned King? Has there had been an usurper who persuaded the Danish parliament that Claudius should succeed King Hamlet?

Gertrude is described as “our sometime sister, now our queen; the imperial jointress to this warlike state”, which symbolises that she possessed a legal jointure (an invention of the Tudor legal system that allowed a man to leave his estate to his widow rather than his children). The line suggests, therefore, that there was some legal contract through which Gertrude would inherit the country after King Hamlet’s death. The metaphor of “warlike state” implies that Gertrude has been involved in an argument regarding the succession of the crown to Claudius:  In the same speech, Claudius says: “Nor have we herein barr’d your better wisdoms, which have freely gone with this affair along”, which suggests that the marriage was approved, perhaps even encouraged, by the gathered nobility. There’s a line where Hamlet alludes to this process in Act 5 Scene 2:“He that hath killed my king and whored my mother, Popped in between th’ election and my hopes, Thrown out his angle for my proper life …” So – a combination of King Hamlet’s legal ‘last will and testament’, Gertrude’s legal rights, and a supportive aristocracy led Claudius to assume the throne over Prince Hamlet.

Basic RGBQUESTION! Is Hamlet at all ANGRY AND RESENTFUL that he was NOT crowned as King of Denmark? Is he seeking revenge for not just his father’s ‘murder’ or his mother’s impatient marriage to Claudius – but – also because he has NOT ascended to the throne?

PRESCRIBED TEXT: HAMLET By William Shakespeare.

John Gilbert- Hamlet in the Presence of His Father's Ghost

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As you read the play, you may find it valuable to listen to the audiobook:

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 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD Ms K’s ‘Reading-Journal notes” of the HAMLET

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YOU MUST EXPLORE AND ANALYSE “HAMLET” WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE SYLLABUS RUBRIC

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 dj_b2school_pencilhomework_cemail your questions and comments to:  elk_dancer@hotmail.com
MARKING   CRITERIA
Shakespearean Drama – HAMLET
  •   Explores skilfully how the portrayal of the complex nature of revenge/ loyalty /  life’s journey/ family life /identity/self-determination/independence/ truth Vs deception / happiness/inspiration/personal experience/nationalism/national identity contribute to various and enduring interpretations of the text
     
     
  •   Demonstrates a well-informed understanding of   context, language, form and ideas using well selected and detailed textual   references
     
     
  •   Composes a thoughtful response using language   appropriate to audience, purpose and form

17–20

  •   Explores effectively how the portrayal of the  complex nature of revenge/ life’s journey/family   life/identity/self-determination/independence/ happiness/inspiration/personal   experience/nationalism/national identity contribute to various and enduring   interpretations of the text
  •   Demonstrates an informed understanding of   context, language, form and ideas using relevant and detailed textual   references
  •   Composes an effective response using language   appropriate to audience, purpose and form

13–16

  •   Explores how the portrayal of the complex nature   of revenge/life’s journey/family   life/identity/self-determination/independence/ happiness/inspiration/personal   experience/nationalism/national identity contribute to various and enduring   interpretations of the text
  •   Demonstrates an understanding of context,   language, form and ideas with some relevant textual references
  •   Composes a sound response using language   appropriate to audience, purpose and form

9–12

  •   Describes aspects of their own response to the   prescribed text
  •   Makes limited reference to the text
  •   Composes a limited response

5–8

  •   Attempts to explore aspects of their prescribed   text using elementary knowledge of the text
  •   Attempts to compose a response to the question

1–4

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You MUST MUST MUST view this context and analysis guide to HAMLET…
(like… you must!)

  dj_b2school_pencilhomework_cemail your comments and questions to: elk_dancer@hotmail.com

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Why even study HAMLET? Is it even relevant today?

*dj_b2school_pencilhomework_c email your questions and comments to: elk_dancer@hotmail.com

 

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TEXTUAL INTERGRITY IN HAMLET

 

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It’s ALWAYS important to consider and reference the original context of the play
when attempting to interpret the ideas, characters and their relationships…

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YOU WILL NEED TO BASE YOUR INTEPRETATION WITHIN A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK…
This slide-show will give you a starting point from which to work.

 

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TERM 2 2015
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**HINTS AND TIPS FOR MODULE C – PEOPLE AND LANDSCAPES… JUDITH WRIGHT.

Key statements from the syllabus rubric notes
(Mod. C – People and Landscapes)

  • You will engage with and respond to the representations of nature within the selected poems. Wright’s portraits of people within distinctive Australian landscapes are striking and poignant in themselves, and are often used by the poet to represent and reflect on the process of poetic creation.
  • The evocative language of the poems and subtle nuances of mood and tone reflect the poet’s deep appreciation of and love for the countryside.
  • You will consider the power of poetry to represent individuals’ experiences of the natural environment and the significance it holds for them.
  • Judith Wright is widely regarded as one of Australia’s greatest poets. Her work is valued for its representation of the Australian environment and relationships between humans and nature.
  • Wright’s political activism focused on conservation and social issues, primarily Aboriginal land rights. These impulses, and particularly her environmental concerns, are reflected in many of her poems.

In Wright’s poetry, representations of people and the landscape serve to share important messages about the way people have interacted and continue to interact with our environment. Wright’s poetry reflects her childhood experiences in a pastoralist family and, in her later years, as an environmental activist. Her work explores a deep awareness of the precarious relationship between humans and the land. Through her highly symbolic poetry, Wright creates rich images which expose the intricate cultural, social and environmental connections between people and the native Australian landscape. Paradoxically, her poems do not simply remain as remembered images of a distant place, experience and time. Rather, the representation of people and landscapes develops a bridge to the present and the future.  Wright’s poems South of My Days and Flame Tree in The Quarry offer support for raising environmental activism, a movement she embraced wholeheartedly in her lifetime. In South Of My Days, Wright creates nostalgic representations of the Australian past to symbolize the fragile link between different cultures in a distinctive landscape. A more desolate view of native landscape being sacrificed to new commercial values is represented by Wright in Flame Tree in The Quarry

PracticeArrow

PRACTISE HSC TRIAL EXAMINATION QUESTIONS FOR MODULE C – PEOPLE AND LANDSCAPES – Poems of Judith Wright.

Allow about 40 minutes for this section Answer the question in a SEPARATE writing booklet.

In your answer you will be assessed on how well you:

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  • demonstrate understanding of and evaluate the relationship between representation and meaning within the context of  People and Landscapes
  • organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and form

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SAMPLE QUESTION 1.

 “Judith Wright is widely regarded as one of Australia’s greatest poets. Her work is valued for its representation of the Australian environment and relationships between humans and nature”

Evaluate how Judith Wright’s poetry  and one other text represents the relationship between humans and nature.

In your answer, you must make detailed reference to at least TWO of the prescribed poems and one other text of your own choosing.

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SAMPLE QUESTION 2.

“In her poetry, Judith Wright represents the experience of particular landscapes and their significance for the individual or society more broadly.”

Evaluate and explain how composers represent this experience.

In your answer, you must make detailed reference to at least TWO of Judith Wright’s prescribed poems and one other text of your own choosing.

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SAMPLE QUESTION 3.

How do various textual representations of people and landscapes cultivate a deeper understanding of ideas and attitudes about the relationship between individuals and the natural environment?

In your answer, you must make detailed reference to at least TWO of the prescribed poems and one other text of your own choosing.

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experience and landscape

life and deathFlame Tree in A Quarry
(life and death / regeneration / time and the cycle of life / the awesome power of nature)

SAMPLE ANALYTIC PARAGRAPH:

A bleak view emerges in the poem “Flame Tree in a quarry”. The juxtaposition suggested in the title of the “flame tree” in the “quarry” sets up the negative impact of time on nature, as the beauty of the tree is taken over by the quarry. It seems that nature is sacrificed this time to the commercial activity of the quarry but Wright only refers to “quarry” in the title and implicitly in the first alliterative line “broken bone of the hill”. The destruction of the landscape is revealed by the cumulative imagery created by the lexical chain of  “broken”, “stripped”, “left for dead,” and the simile “like a wrecked skull” . By representing the deathly landscape Wright is accentuating the tragedy of the loss of nature. The visual tragedy is further emphasised through the aural effect of the alliterative metaphor of the “bush of blood”, creating a violent pounding sound. Further, the biblical allusion to the burning bush is a sign of regeneration. This time the singer is not a bush storyteller as in ‘South of my Days’ but the earth struggling to make a “cry of praise”, a biblical allusion to a hymn. The land in this poem takes on a spiritual dimension, with the biblical allusion to the act of  communion in “the song made flesh”. Wright is not just an observer but an active participant in the spiritual communion offered by the land, evident in “I drink you with my sight/ and I am filled with fire.”  She herself stated in an interview (1965) that in nature “we can perceive… an inescapable correspondence with the processes of our own bodies” and this is clearly elucidated in the poem. The appearance of the vibrant red flowers of the flame tree becomes the alliterative “bush of blood”, the symbolic “fire” and the “scarlet breath”. The metaphoric “fountain of hot joy” paradoxically is also a “living ghost of death” like the “host” of the communion. Despite the tragedy of the scene, there is a strong sense of hope that with the passing of time, nature will return and reclaim the space of the quarry. Wright’s Flame Tree in A Quarry is a powerful representation of romantic ideals of the awesome and regenerative power of nature. Nature symbolically represents the natural and inevitable cycle of human life and human experiences of loss and renewed hope.

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**HINTS AND TIPS FOR THE HSC AREA OF STUDY EXAMINATION: PAPER 1 – SECTION 1

THE FIRST PART….

THE SECOND PART…

 

You will need to brainstorm ‘CONCEPT STATEMENTS’ which fit most accurately with your texts..

Here are some examples:

  • Discovery  is the process by which our lives are enriched.
  • Discovery is a transitional and transformative process which influences the values and perceptions of individuals, groups and the broader world.
  • It is  through discovery that we grow to maturity.
  • Discovery  allows us to view life in a new and fresh way.
  • Discovery can initiate new values in both a personal and global context.
  • The  process of discovery is the journey of life.
  • Discovery  is the process by which humanity advances.
  • Discovery  can lead to the rejuvenation of friendships and wellbeing.
  • Discovery  allows us to speculate about the real and the imagined.
  • Finding  that which was lost enables us to expand our horizons.
  • Discovering  our own perspectives leads to self-awareness.
  • Rediscovering  can lead to new understandings of ourselves and others.
  • Time  can change one’s perspective of a discovery.
  • Discoveries  that seem valuable at the time may later be challenged as to their worth.
  • Travelling  to new places, or viewing a familiar place through new eyes, can transform our  understanding of ourselves and the world.
  • It is  through the process of discovering what we really believe, that we actually  affirm our beliefs.
  • Discovery  allows us to view the hidden experience as a common human experience.
  • Discoveries  allow audience’s contextual perspectives to be affirmed as common human  experience.

ARE YOU STILL WONDERING WHICH “TEXT OF YOUR OWN CHOOSING” YOU’RE GOING TO USE??

TRY USING A TEXT WHICH WE STUDIED IN YR 11 LAST YEAR!

– and change the focus from “change” – or another focus area – to “DISCOVERY”

eg: The Sea Eats The Land At Home – Kofi Awoonar

Kofi Awoonor CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD The Sea Eats the Land at Home Kofi Awoona

Think about the steps of discovery for the persona AND the responder (you).

Here are a few ideas…

  1. The trigger to discovery is the sea of colonization – the process of the discovery is emotional and confronting for the persona (who is powerless against the “sea”) – the process of the persona’s discovery positions the responder to experience an emotional – intellectual – world ( cultural – philosophical) discovery.
  2. The responder experiences the persona’s sense of loss and is positioned to empathize with the perspective of the persona who has had a discovery that has been forced upon them.
  3. You need to view the entire poem and “discovery” from the perspective of the persona – which forces a modern, western responder to empathise and consider new and confronting discoveries of the ‘self’ – other cultures – and the broader world.
  4. The extended metaphor of “the sea” represents the trigger of discovery. The trigger to the persona’s uninvited discovery is the invasion of the persona’s “home” by the colonizing “sea”. The “sea” represents the unstoppable power and eroding force of imperialism on a traditional, indigenous society.
  5. The persona discovers their own lack of power when confronted by such overwhelming force. The symbolism of “the land” represents the stability and traditions of the persona’s cultural values and beliefs.
  6. The “sea” – and it’s constant motion – implies the ongoing process of discovery that is methodically and systematically forced onto the persona and the “land at home. The “sea” keeps on coming and is personified to “eat[s] the land at home”. The personification of “sea eats the land…” creates a powerful image of the invading culture as devouring the persona’s beliefs, values and traditions. In devouring “land”, Awoona implies that the persona’s culture and hopes are consumed and changed. The implied consequence of the forced discovery – of imperialist values and “civilization” – is that the persona, her culture and her “home” becomes – literally – absorbed by the invading “sea”.

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ON-LINE-HSC-EXAM-PREPARATION2

BE PREPARED FOR THE TRIALS IN WEEK 1 – NEXT TERM!

2003_hsc_papersPracticeArrow

 

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD “HSC ENGLISH EXAMINATION – PAPER 1”  – Discovery practice paper #1 (Childhood Discovery)

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD “HSC ENGLISH EXAMINATION – PAPER 1 ” – Discovery practice paper  #2 (Physical / attitudinal Discovery)

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD “HSC ENGLISH EXAMINATION – PAPER 1” – Discovery practice paper  #3 (Self Discovery)

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD “HSC ENGLISH EXAMINATION – PAPER 1” – Discovery practice paper #4 (World / Cultural Discovery)

TRIAL EXAM PREPARATION: HSC Adv. English Class compulsory course-work task.  

essay vocab thinking discovery      analysis table    

Essay  question (received on Monday 15/6/15)

To be written in-class on Wednesday 17/6/15

Answer the following question in an essay – which sustains a clear and rubric-inspired thesis in accurately-structured analytic paragraph(s). 

How has the concept of discovery been conveyed through the representations of people, relationships, societies, places, events and ideas in the prescribed text and ONE other related text of your own choosing?

In your answer, you should focus specifically on 3 of the following representations:

1. People (self / individuals / groups / families / communities…

2. Relationships (self / couples / with a place / with a culture / with ideas and beliefs…

3. Societies (ethnic groups / cultural groups / socio-economic groups / nationalities / professional groups… 

4. Places (landscapes / cities / suburban / city / urban / rural / countries / displaced temporary / homes /…

5. Events (conflict / celebrations / ceremonies / sporting / cultural festivals / historical occasions…

6. Ideas (concepts / bodies of knowledge / philosophical / psychological / values / beliefs / attitudes…

Essential Criteria:

ALL PLANNING AND DRAFTING MUST BE HAND-WRITTEN. Essay must be written in 50 minutes… by hand. The essay is an open-book task.

1.     Unpack the question

2.     Compose a solid and precise thesis statement

3.     Compose at least 3 supporting detail statements (for your introduction)

TIPs!!!
Make sure you use:
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the syllabus rubric statements AND
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THE AREA-OF-STUDY PARAGRAPH PLANNER guide (which your were given in class… and which is on our webpage)

 

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How to write a REFLECTION STATEMENT…
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PLANNING YOUR NARRATIVE…

Planning your narrative which shows “conflicting or contrasting notions of discovery”

Step one: write three different statement sentences for “conflicting or contrasting notions of discovery”

Eg:

(i) Despite experiencing the same process of discovery, different individuals may react (emotionally) and respond (intellectually) in vastly different ways.

(ii) Whilst the same experience of discovery can be equally confronting and challenging, different individuals cope with the process of discovery according to their own contrasting perspectives.

(iii) The long-term consequences of social or cultural discoveries can vary among individuals, and often depends on the life experience and values of each individual.

IF YOU WRITE THE SAME CONCEPTS AS I HAVE LISTED – YOU STILL NEED TO COME UP WITH THREE OF YOUR OWN CONCEPT STATEMENTS!!!

Step two: choose one of the three concepts statements, which resonate most strongly with you – ie: which statement to you really just “get!”

Write your chosen concept statement* out again.

 

Step Three: Draw up three different time-lines for three possible ‘plot-lines’ for your one concept statement*

Your timelines must plot the following aspects of change:

  1. The “ORDINARY WORLD” (before the discovery)
  2. The TRIGGER to the discovery
  3. The PROCESSES and reactions to the discovery
  4. The long-term or significant CONSEQUENCES of the discovery

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The Response – the following video is also part of the “prescribed text” GO BACK TO WHERE YOU CAME FROM”

You must explore and analyse this video.
Click here to view “The Response” video

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Week 4-5

 

 

WEEK 3. GO BACK TO WHERE YOU CAME FROM – prescribed text.

HSC Adv. English Class Task.                                                                       Friday. 8-5-15

 

Analytic Paragraph question.

Answer the following question in accurately-structured analytic paragraph(s).

The opening sentences of the analytic paragraph have been provided for you. Complete the paragraph.

Extension activity… you may choose to write more than one paragraph. 

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“The concept of Discovery is     represented in both ideas and techniques throughout the text Go Back To     Where You Came From (GBTWYCF). The documentary represents ideas of     world discovery, self-discovery and discovery of place.”
In the documentary Go Back To Where You Came From (GBTWYCF),     how does the social experiment represent concepts of planned and deliberate world discovery?

Paragraph Answer:

World discovery includes both the philosophical discovery of the world, and the physical act of discovering the world, or an alternate world. In the core text, Go Back To Where You Came From world discovery is a planned physical discovery. The purpose of the series GBTWYCF is framed in this context as participants are exposed to the journey, and world, of a refugee. The participants leave their ordinary worlds, and embark on an unknown “social experiment. [continue]… ____________________________…

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AREA OF STUDY – guide to writing a narrative.

 

 

WEEK 2. CONCEPTS OF DISCOVERY in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness

What notions of discovery are represented in the framed narrative of Heart Of Darkness?

heart of darkness flow chart

DUE WEDNESDAY WEEK 3. 6TH OF MAY

Write a detailed analytic paragraph which answers the following question:

Within Marlow’s narrative, how does Joseph Conrad represent concepts of discovery?

 

heart of darkness flow chart

analytic paragraph planner

 

WEEK 1. HOMEWORK TASK. Due Tuesday, week 2.

1. In your own words, explain in detail (using evidence) your definition of “discovery”
2. Research and copy a dictionary / encyclopedia definition of “discovery”
3. Write a detailed list of synonyms for “discovery” & “discover” & “discovered” & “discovering” & “rediscovered”
Your homework must be submitted on A4 paper… not in your workbooks.

AREA OF STUDY – DISCOVERY 

 FLOWCHART

PRESCRIBED TEXT:O’Mahoney, Ivan, Go Back to Where You Came From – Series 1, Episodes 1, 2 and 3 and The Response
O’Mahoney, Ivan Go Back to Where You Came From –Series 1, Episodes 1, 2 and 3 and The Response (2011) Madman Area of Study: Discovery AND ESL, Area of Study: Discovery Media

 

 

FILM TECHNIQUES

A broad range of composers create as wide a variety of texts to represent the equally varied number of concepts about DISCOVERY. Each composer represents their own perspective of their experience of the process and the consequences of “DISCOVERY”.

Even texts that you take for granted as being “factual” can offer new perceptions as individuals and societies become more aware of the realities of the world in which they live. eg:

 

 

For example…

And…

Heart Of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

A novella published in 1899.

heart-of-darkness_joseph-conrad
here’s a little background on this classic…

Week 9 and 10, Term 1. 2015

REVISION OF MODULE C: PEOPLE AND LANDSCAPES

JUDITH WRIGHT POETRY

Prescribed poems – Moving South & For New England

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD a partially-complete ‘Analysis Table’ – Moving South

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD a partially-complete ‘Analysis Table’ – For New England

“Moving South” by Judith Wright.

IN-CLASS TASK-

  1. What is the most significant poetic technique used throughout the poem Moving South?
  2. What does this technique represent about people’s relationship with the land?
  3. Describe the two different landscapes which are represented in the poem. Provide quotes to support your descriptions.
  4. Does the persona show a preference for one landscape over the other? Evidence?
  5. How significant is the allusion to French Romanticism in “beaute de Diable” (the devil in beauty – in beauty is the devil)? Find other lines / images in the poem which also represent the complexity of nature within the landscapes as being an extended metaphor of the complexity of human relationships (romantic or otherwise).

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Advanced HSC English In-class Assessment Task:

 Weeks 9 / 10
Term 1. 2015

Module C – Landscapes and People

 Essay Task.  

Write a critical essay which addresses the following question:

“How do the composers of your selected texts explore people’s experience of particular landscapes and their significance     for the individual or society more broadly?”

In your response, you must make detailed reference to Judith Wright’s Poems – Moving South and For New England – and one other related text.

Your submission must include:

  1. Your step-by-step unpacking of the question
  2. Annotated copies and complete analysis tables (or dot-point lists”) of each poem
  3. An annotated copy Or detailed analysis of your related text.
  4. A completed essay which sustains a clear thesis – which is supported by accurate analysis of evidence.
  • You can use the transcript of your speech (Assess. Task  #1) as a starting point.
  • You can use your class notes and resources on our webpage.

Due date: Wednesday 1/4/15

 

TERM 1. 2015

MODULE A: COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TEXTS AND CONTEXTS

ELECTIVE II: “INTERTEXTUAL PERSPECTIVES”

Comparative study of the PRESCRIBED TEXTS (and their contexts) :

George Orwell 1984 (novel published in 1947
Fritz Lang Metropolis (film released in 1927)


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FRIDAY 6TH MARCH

untitled… and download the following document for some great tips and hints 🙂

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE “before” and “after” corrections to student drafts.

MONDAY 2ND MARCH

Putting it all together… 1984 and Metropolis

Firstly…. a few contextual details you should NOT forget to consider…
1. Metropolis was created AFTER WWI – DURING the chaos and poverty of post-war Germany – & BEFORE Nazi Germany and the Holocaust.
2. 1984 was published AFTER WWII – &  BEFORE the rise of communism and the Cold War.

NOW…

Use the following ideas to push your analysis BEYOND a simple – one-dimensional comparison.

Yes – both composers integrate similar content to show a range of values in their:

  • criticism of the totalitarian / capitalist / Marxist…
  • representation of a dehumanized and angry underclass…
  • the disintegration of romantic ideals of individuality, creativity and ‘God’ in nature through the power of science, political power and…

…yet, the similarities and differences of perspectives are deeply nuanced, highly complex and unresolved:

  1. Through the dystopian feature of cognitive estrangement, Orwell and Lang represent the Marxist view that control and manipulation of language and meaning is fundamental to gaining and maintaining power over individuals and groups in society. On the one hand, Orwell uses _______________________________________ to “dumb-down” _______________________….
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  2. For Orwell, the dominant power perceives imagination and free-speech as potentially dangerous, which underpins the systematic dehumanization of society. Lang, on the other hand, suggests that dehumanization is the result of_______________________
    _________________________________________________________…
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  3. The texts work as “book ends” for perspectives on modern capitalist development. From the social and economic impacts of early industrialization  – to a dystopic vision of _____
    ______________________________________________________________________…
    .
  4. Ironically, from a romantic perspective, the ‘heart machine’ and the female robot in Metropolis can be viewed as a symbol of the power of science and the failure of romantic idealism. For Orwell, “Big Brother”, the ‘tele-screens’, and the ‘speak-write’ function symbolically as the power of science over romantic ideals of the individual and creativity.
    .
  5. Within a Marxist interpretation, in Metropolis, the bourgeoisie Freder rebels within a powerful capitalist regime in his emotionally-charged discovery of the truth of an unequal dystopian society.  In 1984, however, Winston has full knowledge of the paradoxical lies that Big Brother and he, himself, (in the Ministry of truth) systematically impose on a desensitized middle and proletariat class. Winston ________________________…
    .
  6. The relationship between humanity and technology unite and defines both texts as well revealing their essential contextual differences. The exploration of threats against similar values of love, truth and morality is developed from Lang’s isolated capitalist, mad scientist and labour-force of dehumanized workers (in 1927) to Orwell’s global ___________________________
    ________________________________________________________…
    .
  7. Whereas Lang (Austrian) lived through the horrors of the First World War, Orwell (English) experienced, first hand, the true and often ‘hidden’ realities of both WWI and WWII. The historical differences in their experiences of war (and post-war) Europe may account for the variations of perspectives which a represented in their visions of a dystopian future. Whilst Orwell’s satirical exploration of the abuse of power in a socialist world culminates in a pessimistic and unresolved vision of hopelessness and individual oppression, Lang’s more optimistic epigram in the final scene implies that – if mankind can find and sustain genuine compassion – an ‘equal’ and free future is possible. Although this suggestion is implied, the future ________________________________
    ___________________________________________________….

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BUT WAIT!
THERE’S MORE…

What are we seeing today that matches the values – events – and concepts which connect the texts?

O      Dictatorships and Democracy

O      Oppression and war crimes – Sri-Lanka, Libya, Syria, Ukraine

O      Fear of change – asylum seekers, migrants

O      Revolution- Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Ukraine

O      Removal of liberties in a post 9/11 climate – terrorism à

O      Surveillance culture – monitoring 24/7

O      The distrust and critique of authority- Wikileaks

O      The threat of restriction-  food resources, high inflation, energy supplies/resources

O      Satire – reflects our cynical world and the paradox of being “human” and living in social structures

O      Censorship – China using internet blocks to maintain control of information

O      Media as an ambiguous tool of power (who controls the media?) –  perpetuating blindness/ignorance, propaganda, distortions  –  OR promoting truth?

YOU MUST CONSIDER THE CONTEXTS AND THE PUSPOSE OF EACH COMPOSER

George Orwell?

  • Outsider
  • Spent early years in India as a lonely boy
  • Took a job in Burma with the Indian Imperial police
  • He became at odds with British colonial rule
  • Rejected Victorian social and family values
  • He viewed socialists, fascists and communists as repressive and self-serving
  • Remained skeptical of governments and their willingness to forsake ideals in favour of power
  • WHAT WAS ORWELL’S PURPOSE IN WRITING 1984???

 

Fritz Lang?

  • “I ran away from home… any decent human being should run away from home.” Fritz Lang
  • Had an affair in Belgium… then moved to Brussells.
  • Born in Vienna.
  • First film viewed in 1917. In Brussells. He like dry martini.
  • He was cheeky… “bluffing” for free top-ups of gin.
  • He had an eye for beautiful girls.
  • He worked as a free-lance photographer.
  • He was fascinated by “moving pictures”. He started writing them – but did not film them himself.
  • 1918 – He was sick. He was near-sighted (which is why he didn’t fight in WWI).
  • He was an opportunist – and a clever negotiator.
  • He acted in a play –for 1000 kronon.
  • From this play – he was approached to make films in Vienna. He was employed as a “dramatorcue” (the ‘story’ writer. He had no idea about making film
  • Some time after the release of Metropolis, Lang was summoned to the ‘Ministry of Propaganda’ by Goebbels (Hitelr’s right-hand-man and master of propaganda) and “offered” the position of film director of all future Nazi (propaganda) films. He responded to the job offer by fleeing to Paris.

 

THURSDAY 26TH FEBRUARY

unpack the assess question

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

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Dominant, Alternative and Resistant Readings of literature.

untitledhint 

If you’re still a little stuck on figuring out what your main (heightened) idea – point of view – perspective is (about the world)… that you have after your study of Orwell’s 1984 and Lang’s Metropolis… you will definitely get some great ideas from the following two videos!!

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.Content of Metropolis = German Expressionism

.A Review of different “readings” of texts.

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Friday 20/2/2015

1. “tripartite structure”??

adjective

  1. divided into three parts; threefold
  2. having three corresponding parts or copies
  3. made or existing between three parties, as an agreement

 

2. anachronism

noun

  1. The definition of anachronism is a person or thing that is placed in a time period where it does not fit.

    If a movie about ancient Egypt showed a Pharaoh wearing a wristwatch, the wristwatch would be an example of an anachronism.

adjective

  1. The definition of anachronistic is something that is not in the correct time period.
    Listening to vinyl records in the 21st century is an example of an anachronistic activity.

 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A QUICK GUIDE TO “Elements of Dystopian Fiction”

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WHAT IS TOTALITARIANISM??

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Week 4


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Week 3

What are the conventions of Science Fiction – Dystopian Fiction? (think – “content” of texts)

genre...theory

genre...theory_conventions

What *IS* Verisimilitude… (besides being a “content” feature of 1984 and Metropolis)?

WEEKS 1-2

What do you have to *DO* in Module A?

 

Module C – Representation and Text: “People and Landscapes”

Judith Wright did not live the quintessential “happy childhood”. She did not experience her world as dictated by the predominantly English social and cultural norms of wealthy graziers of  20th century, Australia. Her childhood was punctuated with the daily challenges of living with an invalid mother and a hard-working father; losing her mother at the tender age of 12 and moving in with her Aunt; then, being shipped off to a traditional Anglican all-girl boarding school in Armidale when her father remarried in 1929.  It can be expected that she felt abandoned by the people who were supposed to love her most. There must have been times when she felt completely wretched, empty and hopeless. It can be assumed that, evidenced in the distinctive images of landscapes and people in her poetry, that she found solace in the natural landscape of her New England. Her life experience can be traced in the symbolic images of the unique native Australian landscape and in her connection to the romantic values of God in nature. The isolation in her personal world is further reflected in romantic images which connate the significance of the individual over post-colonial Australian social expectations.

It wasn’t only in her childhood that Wright experienced isolation, frustration and hopelessness. Hers was not to be a fairy-tale ending. After graduating from the girls’ school, Wright studied philosophy, English, Psychology and history at the University of Sydney. Noteworthy here is that, in 1933, it was not customary for country girls to attend the University of Sydney. University was, traditionally, very much a male domain. At the beginning of World War II, she returned to her father’s station to help during the shortage of labour caused by the war. This return to her family may have been difficult for Wright. She may have harboured her own post-graduate ambitions which were now stymied by family and social obligations. On her return to New England, she would have experienced the “coal face” of a changing rural economy which was impacting on a fragile landscape to which she was intimately attached. She would have observed the loss of the old stories and unique identity of the people and the landscape. She would have observed the increasingly sharp divisions between the pastoralists and the original inhabitants of the land. Her poetry resonates with the stories of an English colonial culture becoming increasingly irrelevant in the distinctive Australian landscape.

WEEK 8

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD AN ANNOTATED COPY OF “Train Journey”

train

Potential Supporting text – Interview with Melanie Hogan and Bob Randall

 

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A COPY OF “BROTHER AND SISTERS” annotated version

 

WEEK 7

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE “CHEAT SHEET” FOR YOUR SPEECH

experience and landscape

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A COPY OF Train Journey

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD SOME KEY IDEAS ABOUT People and Landscapes in Wright’s poetry

 

Train Journey

by Judith Wright

Glassed with cold sleep and dazzled by the moon,
out of the confused hammering dark of the train
I looked and saw under the moon’s cold sheet
your delicate dry breasts, country that built my heart;

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and the small trees on their uncoloured slope
like poetry moved, articulate and sharp
and purposeful under the great dry flight of air,
under the crosswise currents of wind and star.

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Clench down your strength, box-tree and ironbark.
Break with your violent root the virgin rock.
Draw from the flying dark its breath of dew
till the unliving come to life in you.

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Be over the blind rock a skin of sense,
under the barren height a slender dance…

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I woke and saw the dark small trees that burn
suddenly into flowers more lovely that the white moon.

WEEK 6

THURSDAY 13-11-14

kanyini

kanyini

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE analysis-on-one-page MATRIX

WEDNESDAY 12-11-14

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A COPY OF “BROTHER AND SISTERS”

TUESDAY 11-11-14

life and death

What are some of the people’s experience of particular landscapes which are explored in Judith Wright’s poetry?

What is the significance of the landscape for the individual or society more broadly in Judith Wright’s poetry?

South Of My Days:

  • Attachment to place – attachment to the landscape of New England
  • Individual stories and experiences shaped by the uniquely Australian landscape
  • The rich tapestry of the landscape mirrors the richness of the individual recollected stories of uniquely Australian people
  • The voice of the “Old Dan” is the ‘metaphysical’ voice of the land – the voice of the old settlers and the voice of the original owners of the land

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A GUIDE TO THE “big ideas and experiences” which are explored in Wright’s poetry

YOUR “TO DO” LIST for homework.
To be completed by Monday Week 7.

  1. CLICK HERE AND DOWLOAD A LIST OF “Ideas” ABOUT JUDITH WRIGHT’S POETRY (read it carefully)
  2. COMPLETE THE ANALYSIS TABLES FOR ALL THE POEMS WE HAVE STUDIED SO FAR (SOMD / FTIAQ / HH / BAS)
  3. COMPLETE THE ‘poem-analysis-on-a-page” TABLE FOR EACH POEM
  4. SELECT YOUR RELATED TEXT and complete the annotation + the analysis table + the text-analysis-on-a-page” tale for your selected text
  5. UNPACK THE ASSESSMENT TASK speech question and review the marking criteria of the speech

 

WEEK 5 – TERM 4 – 2014

Thursday. 6/11/14

“As we get past our superficial material wants and instant gratification we connect to a deeper part of ourselves, as well as to others, and the universe.” Judith Wright

HAWTHORN HEDGE

 annotate

Task:

  1. Download the partially annotated copy of  THE HAWTHORN HEDGE and complete the annotation. …then…
  2. Download the analysis table for THE HAWTHORN HEDGE and complete your analysis

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A PARTIALLY ANNOTATED “The Hawthorn Hedge”

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A COPY OF “THE HAWTHORN HEDGE” Analysis Table:_ideas

 

 

WEEK 4. TERM 4, 2014

THURSDAY 30th October

Hello you lovely Advanced English students! Please accept my apologies for not being there in-person. The short story? Bronchitis – 1 / Miss Krieger – 0

PLEASE FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS… IN THE ORDER IN WHICH THEY ARE LISTED!

YOU MAY WORK IN PAIRS – BUT NOT IN SMALL GROUPS.

instructions

TASK 1.

1. CLICK HERE AND DOWNLOAD THE Summary highlights of the academic paper on Judith Wright’s poetry and… READ the article.
Yes… read it again!
You should focus on the highlighted sections. The discussion should make a lot more sense to you today.
You should write down the parts of the highlighted sections which are most relevant to your understanding of the poems we’ve studied so far.

TASK 2.

2. Using your copies of the annotations of “SOUTH OF MY DAYS” and “FLAME TREE IN A QUARRY” complete the “Poem Analysis Table” for each poem.
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD Flame Tree in a Quarry Analysis Table by Miss K

See below for the links for downloading ‘The Poem Analysis Table’ documents (if you haven’t already done so).

 TASK 3.

3. THIS IS COMPULSORY HOMEWORK IF YOU DON’T GET IT DONE DURING CLASS! Click on the following link to download a copy of the next poem set for study. Your task is to HAND WRITE the poem into a piece of A4 or A3 paper.
MAKE SURE THAT YOU REPLICATE THE LINES AND STANZAS EXACTLY AS THEY APPEAR IN THE ORIGINAL.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A COPY OF “The Hawthorn Hedge

 

WEDNESDAY 29/10/14

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE analysis table for Flame Tree in a Quarry – table

MONDAY 27th OCTOBER. HOMEWORK TASK!

HOMEWORK

TASK INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. DOWNLOAD THE POEM “FLAME TREE IN A QUARRY” (see link below)
  2. SAVE FILE AS A WORD DOCUMENT AND CLICK ON “enable editing”
  3. USING THE “ADD NEW COMMENT” FUNCTION IN THE “REVIEW” TAB, ANNOTATE THE POEM
  4. NAME ALL THE LANGUAGE / POETIC TECHNIQUES AND ADD RELEVANT NOTES RE: symbolism OF BOTH People and Landscapes
  5. SAVE ANNOTATED DOCUMENT – which will be collected and saved digitally on a USB in class

 

FLAME TREE IN A QUARRY by Judith Wright

flame tree       images

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A COPY OF THE NEXT POEM: Flame Tree in a Quarry

 

Week 3. Term 4

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE STEP 3 OF THE PROCESS “analysis of S_O_M_D – practice table”

 

 

HOMEWORK!    Click here to listen to Professor Lyn McCredden from Deakin University speak in detail about the poetry of Judith Wright featured in the Australian Senior School English Syllabi.

listen

annotation SOMY

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLAOD A COPY OF “SOUTH OF MY DAYS” – annotated version

somd   imagesCA9FSVEE

 

 

 

 

Week 1 – 2. Term 4:

WHO IS (was) JUDITH WRIGHT? what are (were) her values? what is (was) her experience? what is (was) her view on the relationship between people and landscapes? what is the purpose of her poetry?

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE GUIDE TO Judith Wright (including podcasts and interviews)

listen

 Listen to Judith Wright’s daughter (Meredith McKinney) talk about her mother.
Listen to Ms McKinney discuss the prescribed poem “South Of My Days”

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE TO THE RUBRIC – Module C – Representation and Text

poems

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